Heart Health

Move of the month: Opposite arm and leg raise

By , Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

This month’s exercise targets your core, strengthening muscles of the abdomen, lower back, front of the hip (called hip flexors), and spine. A strong core supports heart health by helping you stay active, as many popular sports such as cycling, golf, tennis, and swimming depend on a stable, flexible core.

photo of a woman performing step one of the opposite arm and leg raise exercise as described in the text

Starting position: Kneel on all fours with your hands and knees directly aligned under your shoulders and hips. Keep your head and spine neutral.

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About the Author

photo of Julie Corliss

Julie Corliss, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

Julie Corliss is the executive editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. Before working at Harvard, she was a medical writer and editor at HealthNews, a consumer newsletter affiliated with The New England Journal of Medicine. She … See Full Bio
View all posts by Julie Corliss

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