Workplace health

Why won’t some health care workers get vaccinated?

COVID-19 vaccination rates among health care workers in nursing homes and long-term care facilities have been lower than expected. Is this an information problem or does it stem from other issues –– and what can be done?

Making the most of physical activity apps

Most people know exercise is good for their health, but only about half of Americans meet the recommended physical activity guidelines. Making exercising more fun helps keep people interested, and research has demonstrated that there is a relationship between using activity apps and increased engagement in exercise.

As the pandemic drags on, when can we get back to work?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, many people wonder when they can go back to their workplaces. The answers may depend on where a person lives and works, findings from antibody tests, and other factors.

Do employee wellness programs actually work?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Do employee health programs lead to healthier, more productive employees? A large study shows little or no impact, although results might vary based on workplace, offerings, and other factors.

The heart and science of kindness

Acts of kindness — to loved ones, to strangers, to ourselves — make the world a warmer place. And seeking ways to be kind can make you happier, too.

How to handle stress at work

Stress at work is common and can lead to burnout, which is linked with depression and anxiety. Strategies from cognitive behavioral therapy can help people learn to manage stress.

Brain science to improve your relationships

Srini Pillay, MD

Contributor

Being aware of the brain’s reactions to other people can help improve all our relationships.

How to welcome back a colleague who is in recovery

If a colleague has been absent from work for treatment of a substance use disorder, that person’s return to work may be awkward or uncomfortable, and coworkers may feel similarly. Empathy, understanding, and a willingness to listen will help returning workers feel welcomed back.

Working through workplace stigma: Coming back after an addiction

For many people, the most significant challenge when returning to the workplace after treatment for a substance use disorder is overcoming the doubts that coworkers may have about working with an addict. But doubt may weigh just as heavily on the person returning to work.

Working on addiction in the workplace

Addiction among employees costs American businesses billions each year, so it’s in employers’ interest to promote a healthy, drug-free workplace and facilitate treatment for those employees who seek it.