Breast Cancer

Aspirin and breast cancer risk: How a wonder drug may become more wonderful

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Over the years, the list of aspirin’s potential benefits has grown: a number of studies suggest that taking aspirin regularly can lower the risk of certain types of cancer. Now recent studies suggest that aspirin may also reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Is it time to give up your annual mammogram?

The question of what age a woman can stop having mammograms does not have a definite answer, but is one each woman must answer based on her circumstances and her feelings about the risks of the procedure versus its benefits.

Dense breasts on a mammogram? What to know and do

Mammograms look for signs of breast cancer. They can also provide information on whether a woman has high breast density, which slightly increases risk for developing breast cancer. Here’s what you need to know and do if you’re notified about this risk factor.

Cancer treatment: Is a clinical trial right for you?

Some people undergoing cancer treatment may be eligible to participate in a clinical trial of a new drug or therapy. These trials help determine whether a new approach is more effective than standard treatment.

Fear of cancer recurrence: Mind-body tools offer hope

As the number of cancer survivors continues to grow, many continue to worry for years after treatment ends about a recurrence of the disease. These people need post-treatment support, and mind-body techniques offer a promising solution.

Heart disease and breast cancer: Can women cut risk for both?

While they share many risk factors, far more women are living with heart disease than with breast cancer. Exercise and a healthy diet can cut a woman’s risk for both.

Screening mammograms: One recommendation may not fit all

Research shows that the risk of breast cancer, and its severity, is greater for women of certain racial and ethnic backgrounds. These factors have not yet been included in formal guidelines for screening mammograms, but women need to be aware of them.

Revisiting options for improving results of breast reconstruction

Ted A. James, MD

Contributor

Women who choose breast reconstruction after mastectomy but are unhappy with the results have another option: fat grafting, in which liquefied tissue from another part of the body is injected into the reconstructed breast.

Thyroid disease and breast cancer: Is there a link?

Mallika Marshall, MD

Contributing Editor

Researchers have wondered for a long time whether there might be a link between excess thyroid hormone and an increased risk of breast cancer. High levels of thyroid hormone have been shown to mimic estrogen, which fuels many breast cancers. A new study has suggested that there may indeed be a link — but it’s important to put the results into context.

New mammography guidelines call for starting later and screening less often

The age at which women should start having screening mammograms, and how often, has been controversial for some time. Reputable national organizations have differed in their recommendations. Accumulating data suggest that for women under 45, screening mammograms may bring more harm than good. As a result, the American Cancer Society has radically shifted its screening guidelines for women in their early 40s at an average risk for breast cancer.